New Author Recounts His Hollywood Mission

December 20, 2011 by  
Filed under Christian News

Steve Cha committed career suicide. And he did it willingly, by becoming a missionary on one of the world’s most dangerous mission fields: Hollywood.

With the fourth Mission Impossible film (Ghost Protocol) releasing this month, Cha says “Christians need to start making a difference in the entertainment industry, the community around them, and the entire world by evangelizing lost souls.” And that’s exactly what he did.

Hollywood Mission PossibleIn his book, “Hollywood Mission: Possible” (WinePress Publishing, 2011), Cha recounts his three-year stint as a background actor (extra) in tinsel town. While working on the set of over a hundred films, television shows, and commercial productions, Cha evangelized background artists, crew members, and even A-list celebrities such as Brad Pitt, David Fincher, Tori Spelling, and James Woods. His book also includes evangelism stories of such media giants like Steven Spielberg, Harrison Ford, and Dan Aykroyd.

“As an ambassador for Christ, I have been loved, hated, misunderstood, ignored, questioned, admired, and insulted,” Cha says.

But rejection is to be expected in evangelistic endeavors, he adds. Despite the hostility he faced from so-called “tolerant” entertainment industry professionals, Cha never wavered in his quest to boldly proclaim the gospel message. He is hopeful that more Christian evangelists will share their faith in Hollywood, bringing renewal that ultimately results in the production of God-glorifying media content.

Cha is now on a mission to support Christian actors and actresses and to pray for those he has shared the gospel with in Hollywood. On his official website, Cha profiles people and situations in Tinsel Town so that readers can join him in prayer and look for ways to infiltrate the lives of these key Hollywood players with the light of salvation.

Cha’s autobiography is an in-the-field missionary report of his work in Hollywood. He shares personal stories and the outcomes – both positive and negative – and provides firsthand insights into the spiritually bankrupt condition of the entertainment industry. The book is intended to inspire Christians all around the world to promote the gospel in their everyday lives. It is also aimed at Christians in Hollywood or those seeking to enter it.

“However insignificant we may feel, we each have the potential to make a difference by reaching out to seemingly ‘unreachable’ people,” Cha says. Celebrities are rarely exposed to the gospel in their work environment or within their circle of colleagues. “If we are willing to conquer our fears and are open to spontaneously evangelizing for the greater good of the kingdom, our efforts will prove fruitful.”

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